Category Archives: Online marketing

Free Whitepapers, Webinars And Other Resources For Online Marketing

There’s a lot of free content out there– whitepapers, webinars, YouTube tutorials–but the quality varies. I’ve found three sources that have provided consistently useful training and information about online marketing: HubSpotWordtracker and Citrix Online. (I have no relationship with these businesses.)

Hubspot offers an amazing variety of marketing resources.  They’re a collection of upcoming and archived internet marketing webinars on a variety of topics, from blogging, to search engine marketing, to press releases. I’ve downloaded a number of their whitepapers, including a Guide toNew Facebook Business Page Timelines.

These include guides to social link building, using analytics to evaluate marketing ROI, business blogging mistakes to avoid, and a lot of other topics.

I also get good information from Wordtracker. Go to their Academy for blog posts, books, guides and articles on topics ranging from writing great guest posts on other peoples’ blogs, getting high-quality links from university and academic websites, and more.

I also value resources available from Citrix|Online. When you follow the link, select GoToWebinar from the Select Product dropdown. You’ll find PDF’s and webinars on (surprise!) creating and leading effective webinars. Topics include tools for webinar engagement, creating effective presentations, and others.m Wordtracker. Go to their Academy for blog posts, books, guides and articles on topics ranging from writing great guest posts on other peoples’ blogs, getting high-quality links from university and academic websites, and more.

 

 

 

The Elevator Pitch: 6 Tips from the Heath Brothers

The elevator pitch is an adventure in selling yourself or your products. And it’s very challenging to distill your value proposition into 30 seconds.

I received an e-newsletter from the Heath brothers, Chip and Dan, authors of Switch and Made to Stick, with 6 tips for “Giving a Great Elevator Pitch.”

One tip particularly caught my attention: “If your topic is complex, use the anchor and twist format.” The core of the advice is that you start with something people are already deeply familiar with, and show how you provide something new or different.

They provide an example–getting the message out that CPR is almost as effective without mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Chest pumping alone works pretty well. The American Heart Association chose to call it “CPR lite” or “CPR for dummies.”

CPR is something most people understand. Many people are intimidated by the process, and worry that they won’t do it right. And they’re reluctant to do the mouth-to-mouth part.

To help people quickly grasp the new concept, the AHA started with something familiar, CPR,  and added the new twist–chest-pumping alone can get the job done.

Take a look at a fun article in Inc. that the Heath Brothers recommend: “You Know What Your Company Does. Can You Explain It in 30 Seconds?” It’s a walk-through of the process as led by Dave Yewman and Andy Craig, co-owners of Elevator Speech, a consulting firm.

If you have any tips about how you developed your elevator pitch, I’d love to hear them and share them here.